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Low Tech Tank My Low Tech Tanks

Hey, thanks for sharing the tanks! I'm always interested in low-tech tanks because I don't think I've ever done one. At least, not intentionally like you've done.

I assume the appeal to them is lower maintenance?

Do you mind sharing a little more about the gear you're using and how you're maintaining them?
 
Just wanted to share my two low tech tanks for those who are interested. I rescaped one and the other I fully set up — both this year.

One is a 7g nature style tank with snails and Bloody Mary shrimp. The other is a 16 gallon diorama type scape with pea puffers and chili rasboras. View attachment 587

View attachment 588

Looks excellent (y)
How do you fertilize your low tech tanks?
 
Hey, thanks for sharing the tanks! I'm always interested in low-tech tanks because I don't think I've ever done one. At least, not intentionally like you've done.

I assume the appeal to them is lower maintenance?

Do you mind sharing a little more about the gear you're using and how you're maintaining them?
Wow! I think you are the first person I’ve come across that went straight to high tech, that’s crazy to me. Here are some of the appeals of low tech to me:

-Slower growth rate
-More of a focus on the fauna rather than the flora in a tank.
-~200-300 dollars (possibly more) cheaper to set up per tank.
-Occupies less space and thus can go places high tech tanks cannot.
-Do not get many of the algae types that high tech tanks can get.
-And yes, less maintenance overall and in general low tech systems are more stable systems. At the very least you don’t need to worry about filling up a CO2 cylinder.

7g tank info:
-Just use la tap water which in my area has gotten a lot better in recent years.
-GH ~6
-KH 4-7
-ADA Amazonia in mesh bags topped with scaping sand.
-All in one tank, so there’s a built in sump.
-Hygger heaters. Really like these, external temperature control so you don’t have to get your hands wet to adjust.
-ONF Flat Nano light.
-Plants- buces, anubias nana petite, trident fern mini, windelov, ludwigia Palustris/sp mini

16 gallon:
-UNS 40C tank
-Same tap parameters as above
-Oase filtosmart Thermo 100
-chihiros c2 light (ended up being too small for this tank, probably will change at some point and replace the ONF on the 7 gallon with this).
-Buces, javas, a crypt, moss, and a few stems of my variegated water wisteria that I put in from my high tech tank

Fertilize both with DIY ferts, I do about ½-¾ of APT Complete levels.
 
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Wow! I think you are the first person I’ve come across that went straight to high tech, that’s crazy to me. Here are some of the appeals of low tech to me:

-Slower growth rate
-More of a focus on the fauna rather than the flora in a tank.
-~200-300 dollars (possibly more) cheaper to set up per tank.
-Occupies less space and thus can go places high tech tanks cannot.
-Do not get many of the algae types that high tech tanks can get.
-And yes, less maintenance overall and in general low tech systems are more stable systems. At the very least you don’t need to worry about filling up a CO2 cylinder.

7g tank info:
-Just use la tap water which in my area has gotten a lot better in recent years.
-GH ~6
-KH 4-7
-ADA Amazonia in mesh bags topped with scaping sand.
-All in one tank, so there’s a built in sump.
-Hygger heaters. Really like these, external temperature control so you don’t have to get your hands wet to adjust.
-ONF Flat Nano light.
-Plants- buces, anubias nana petite, trident fern mini, windelov, ludwigia Palustris/sp mini

16 gallon:
-UNS 40C tank
-Same tap parameters as above
-Oase filtosmart Thermo 100
-chihiros c2 light (ended up being too small for this tank, probably will change at some point and replace the ONF on the 7 gallon with this).
-Buces, javas, a crypt, moss, and a few stems of my variegated water wisteria that I put in from my high tech tank

Fertilize both with DIY ferts, I do about ½-¾ of APT Complete levels.
Patience for me has always been a challenge...

I think, also, that when I started, low tech meant really going with Diana Walstad's method which didn't appeal to me. With all due respect to Diana and those that follow her methods, and really probably my own incorrect perception, I found those tanks ugly. I was much more enthralled by the high tech beauties at the time. So, that's the direction I went.

I think today there are so many more options for a low energy tank. I think most people haven't even heard of Diana's method.

Yours look fantastic and easy maintenance and cost are two of the most important things to get a newcomer into the hobby. Well done.
 
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